Korn Ferry Hay Group Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI 360)

$225.00

The feedback received through this assessment represents the perception their raters have of how frequently they demonstrate the 12 leadership competencies, and contrasts this to their self-rating on how frequently they demonstrate these same behaviors. The feedback also provides verbatim comments from their raters on areas they perceive to be their strengths, as well as possible development opportunities.

 

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Description

Emotional and social intelligence makes the difference between a highly effective leader and an average one. A lack of emotional intelligence and therefore emotional competency can lead to toxic behavior which has real dollar costs for organizations.

As Dan Goleman writes in Primal Leadership, emotional intelligence is our aptitude for:

  • Recognizing our own feelings and those of others
  • Motivating ourselves
  • Managing emotions effectively in ourselves and those around us to include those we lead

An emotional competence is a learned capability based on emotional intelligence that contributes to effective performance in a leadership position (or any position for that matter).
The real benefit comes from the 360° view into the behaviors that differentiate outstanding from average performers. It helps managers and professionals create competitive advantage for their organizations by increasing performance, innovation and teamwork, ensuring time and resources are used effectively, and building motivation and trust.

The survey assesses the participant’s demonstration of 12 key leadership competencies associated with emotional and social intelligence, which have been shown through research to contribute to effective performance at work. The ESCI consists of a self-assessment component and feedback from several sources (e.g., supervisors, direct reports, peers, and others)

The feedback received through this assessment represents the perception their raters have of how frequently they demonstrate the 12 leadership competencies, and contrasts this to their self-rating on how frequently they demonstrate these same behaviors. The feedback also provides verbatim comments from their raters on areas they perceive to be their strengths, as well as possible development opportunities.